Book Review – Emergency Medicine: The Principles of Practice 6e by Gordian Fulde and Sascha Fulde


Written by Katherine Gridley, sponsored Elsevier Australia Medical Student Ambassador on October 31st, 2013 in Book Reviews. No Comments

Emergency Medicine: The Principles of Practice 6th edtionby Fulde and Fulde

Emergency Medicine: The Principles of Practice 6th edtionby Fulde and Fulde

Book Review – Emergency Medicine: The Principles of Practice 6th Edition by Gordian Fulde and Sascha Fulde

This fantastic book opens with a quick reference guide that is essentially your ‘get out of jail free’ card for when a general medical or emergency consultant is grilling you. It has everything from your ALS algorithms, how to read an ECG, management of an acute coronary syndrome and how to put in a chest drain; to spirometry guides, fluid prescribing, electrolyte disorders; and even common nerve palsies and how to describe a fracture.

The next 5 chapters are a great overview on emergency in general, including advanced life support, how to manage an airway, essentials of resuscitation and the use of conventional imaging and ultrasound. Chapter 3 is particularly brilliant, as a step-by-step guide on important procedural skills, including IV access, arterial lines, chest drains, catheters, lumbar punctures and the ever-so-exciting emergency style thoracotomy.

The following few chapters are focused on cardiology and respiratory emergencies – your SVTs, ACS, APO and every acronym in between. Next is an excellent overview on shock and pain management, before a number of chapters on surgical emergencies including those encountered in trauma, neurosurgery, vascular, orthopaedics, urology and burns.

The remaining chapters deal with the less common but more exciting aspects of emergency, from drowning, evenomation, electrocutions, overdoses and mass casualty incidents; while also dealing with your common medical (i.e. neurological, gastrointestinal, endocrine and renal) emergencies.

There are two other chapters I would like to highlight, in that if you choose not to read any other part of this book, these two are worth every minute of your time. Chapter 23: The seriously ill patient – the tips and traps was written by Prof Fulde himself, and although the chapter is brief, it exemplifies his wealth of experience. The ED 10 Commandments are gold, as is the list of ‘red lights’ and your discharge checklist. Also, who wouldn’t want to read a paragraph entitled “Do Not Feed the Lawyers”?

The other chapter I’d like to highlight is Chapter 48: A guide for interns working in emergency medicine. This gem is a no-fluff guide to the process of seeing a patient in ED, from taking the history to presenting the case and documentation. There are also some great tips for keeping the peace, including why you cannot cherry-pick your patients, when you should be taking your breaks, and how to hand over a patient.

In summary, ‘Emergency Medicine: The Principles of Practice 6e’ is a wonderful emergency resource, and one that I am sure junior doctors and medical students will enjoy immensely.

For more information about ‘Emergency Medicine: The Principles of Practice 6e’ please visit: http://www.elsevierhealth.com.au/emergency-medicine/emergency-medicine-paperbound/9780729541466

Review By Katherine Gridley, sponsored Elsevier Australia Medical Student Ambassador. Katherine is currently studying medicine at the University of Queensland, Australia.





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